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Vertical farming structures housing crabs.
March 24, 2016

Gills N Claws Aquaculture promotes crab farming

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Seafood supplier Gills N Claws Aquaculture is waiting for approval for crab farming in a vertical farm in Neo Tiew Lane, specialising in Sri Lankan mud crabs.

There are no licensed fish farms cultivating crabs in Singapore now, and the country has to rely on imports, which have amounted to 5,100 MT of crabs in the first eleven months this year.

Imported Sri Lankan mud crabs can cost more than $30 per kilogram from wholesalers. Owner of Gills ‘N’ Claws Aquaculture, Steven Suresh, said rearing the crabs here could lower their wholesale price by at least 10 per cent eventually to about $26 per kilogram.

Gills ‘N’ Claws has a fish farm off Pulau Ubin in Singapore and its parent company, RBI Holding, owns two other crab farms and a mud crab hatchery in Sri Lanka. The crabs will be brought to the farm in Singapore when they are about four months old and weigh about 400g each.

Each crab will be raised in a vertically-stacked, A3-sized plastic container and sprinkled continually with water. They were fed daily with a ground mixture of chicken liver and trash fish caught by the company’s fishing fleet in Pulau Ubin. The farm can hold up to 40,000 crabs.

After about seven weeks when the crabs reach 800g to 1kg each, they are ready for sale.

The farm expects its annual output to reach about 200 MT of crab.